2018. March 21., Wednesday
News  --  Archive  --  2017


Three Former SZTE Students Awarded the Junior Prima Prize

Ten young scientists were awarded the Junior Prima prize, three of whom are former students of the University of Szeged. Two of them currently work at the university as researchers.

The prizes were presented on 24 November 2017 by András Lovász, president of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Edit Juhász, Deputy State Secretary for the Ministry of National Development, and Tamás Bernáth, CEO of the Hungarian Developement Bank (MFB).

Orsolya Dömötör (Faculty of Science and Informatics, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry), Tamás Szalai (Faculty of Science and Informatics, Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics), and Zoltán Varga (Faculty of Medicine, former doctoral student of the Institute of Biochemistry, now assistant professor at the University of Semmelweis, Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy) were awarded the prize.

The Junior Prima prize was first awarded in 2007. It is given to people under the age of 30 for outstanding achievements in different fields. Science is the only field where the age limit is 33. Notable people of scientific fields, academics, professors and professionals asked by the MFB make suggestions as to who should receive the prize every year. There were 58 candidates this year, ten of whom were chosen for their internationally renowned scientific work and publications. The prize was awarded based on the number of publications, presentations, quotations, and scientific results in their respective field of research.

SZTE Experience

HardeepHardeep Kaur - Faculty of Sciences and Informatics - Biology PhD

Many of my Indian friends had already been studying here, and SZTE was very popular among them because of its quality education, research and the international community. Without any doubt I submitted my application for Biology PhD. Now, this city serves second home to me: beautiful, clean and modern at the same time carrying its ethnicity. Once I leave the city, I will miss everything about Szeged especially my friends and workplace.

simsonSimson Ndadaleka Shaakumeni - Faculty of Arts - PhD Studies

I heard about Stipendium Hungaricum from a fellow countryman. I would love to teach at a university one day, but a Doctorate degree is often required in order to do so. That is why I came to Szeged, where I am currently working on my doctoral thesis in educational science – my special field of interest is scientific literacy of students. Life is completely different in Namibia; it is mostly a rural country and agriculture is still hardly mechanised and many homesteads in villages in the countryside are built of wood. The weather is totally different from the one in Szeged, the cold and icy weather caught me by surprise after returning from Christmas holiday, I didn’t have proper shoes so my feet were constantly freezing.